Lady Bird (2017)

Lady Bird (2017)

By Livia Peterson

The poverty stricken and the middle class are infrequently portrayed in the media. Sean Baker’s “The Florida Project” and Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird” perfectly demonstrates the ups and down of the respective social status.

Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) and parents Marion and Larry (Laurie Metcalf and Tracy Letts) live in Sacramento, California. While Marion is a full time nurse and Larry was laid off, Christine is determined to move out of Sacramento and reside and attend college in the East Coast and attends the Catholic school in the meantime. While Christine’s best friend is Julie (Beanie Feldstein), she befriends and establishes romantic relationships with Danny (Lucas Hedges) and Kyle (Timothée Chalamet).

Anchored by the Academy Award caliber performances, particularly by Ronan and Metcalf, “Lady Birds” also provides one of the most refreshing, endearing, and empathetic screenplays. The poverty stricken and middle class families survive based on the paychecks. We sometimes cannot afford to finance certain bills due to the necessities such as food, water, and electricity. While the parents have tolerable jobs, the children boast the minimum wage jobs. Laundry, grocery shopping, and the like must be completed with no complaints. One of the many accessible moments is when Christine steals the magazine to read in bed and Marion declares only rich people read magazines prior to sleep. We would love to be wealthy and yet, we are thankful for what we have. “Lady Bird” demonstrates appreciation for anything and everything goes a long way and parents are strict for several reasons, regardless of the social status.

“Lady Bird” is humane without the sugarcoating and yes, we demand more stories similar to this in the mainstream cinema. It is devastating that we always have to rely on the independent film studios to provide female driven and lifelike narratives. Cannot wait to see Gerwig’s second feature film. A

For Your Consideration: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress in a Leading Role (Saoirse Ronan), Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Laurie Metcalf), and Best Film Editing

Milwaukee Film Announces 2018 Film Festival

Milwaukee Film Announces 2018 Film Festival

Wonder (2017)

Wonder (2017)